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“WORDS TO MY WORRIES”: PARENT/GUARDIAN DISCLOSURE OF CHILD’S SPEECH CONCERNS TO SCHOOL OFFICIALS

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title
“WORDS TO MY WORRIES”: PARENT/GUARDIAN DISCLOSURE OF CHILD’S SPEECH CONCERNS TO SCHOOL OFFICIALS
author
Sanders, Kennedy Elaine
abstract
Research on the disclosure of speech concerns to school officials is essential to understanding help-seeking dynamics for families of children with disabilities. The goal of this study was to understand parent/guardian speech concern disclosure decisions and communication experiences during conversations with school officials to facilitate enhanced care utilization for students with speech concerns. This qualitative study used Communication Privacy Management and the Disclosure Process Model as theoretical frameworks to examine disclosure decisions, processes, and implications. Participants (n=2), all female, participated in semi-structured interviews to share their experiences with disclosing their child’s speech concerns to a school official. Results revealed that decisions to disclose were shaped by perceptions of others, predispositions or concerns, and values, access, and preparation. Conversations were positively facilitated by creating positive affect, information exchange, shared decision making, and perceptions of expertise and credibility. Conversations were hindered by parents’ negative thoughts and feelings and school official reactions being perceived as dismissive or disengaged. In the future, research on this topic can be expanded by studying these disclosures across diverse populations while expanding on experiences regarding stigma and resourcing.
subject
disclosure
disclosure process model
education accessibility
resourcing
schools
speech concerns
contributor
Canzona, Mollie Rose (committee chair)
Kirby-Straker, Rowena Rowie (committee member)
Sizemore, Shelley (committee member)
date
2022-05-24T08:35:50Z (accessioned)
2022-05-24T08:35:50Z (available)
2022 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/100718 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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