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EXPLORATION OF LOWER EXTREMITY INJURY IN THE UNDER BODY BLAST ENVIRONMENT USING A HUMAN BODY FINITE ELEMENT MODEL

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title
EXPLORATION OF LOWER EXTREMITY INJURY IN THE UNDER BODY BLAST ENVIRONMENT USING A HUMAN BODY FINITE ELEMENT MODEL
author
Hostetler, Zachary
abstract
Previous work in the underbody blast (UBB) environment has involved post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) or Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD). One emerging alternative to the use of these human surrogates are computational Human Body Models (HBMs). HBMs offer a unique advantage to overcome the shortcomings of PMHS and ATD testing. The biofidelity of HBMs is a product of their geometry and material definitions. They are developed directly from clinical scan data which provides human anatomical accuracy, and their constitutive material behavior is derived from localized biomechanical testing on PMHS or animal model samples. Furthermore, they do not need to be ruggedized to withstand the physical testing requirements of the UBB environment, unlike ATDs. With the improvements of computational power and modeling comes the benefit of large scale testing using these HBMs. The Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) M50-O model is commonly used for automotive safety testing and validation. Limited work has been done to explore the feasibility and validity of this HBM in extreme military environments, which is the major focus of this work, particularly with respect to the lower extremity. The advantages of a computational approach are numerous, since the models can be used for large scale simulated testing, and for injury prediction assessment. Large scale computational testing (e.g. replication of many cases in a fraction of the time required for physical testing) results in vast amounts of data from each Finite Element (FE) simulation. The model response can be compared to PMHS test subjects on the local level using element strain values or on gross scale through force, kinematics, or any number of combined metrics such as the Tibia Index. Therefore, the objective of this dissertation is to test the feasibility as well as the predictive capabilities of the GHBMC M50-O (average male) HBM model in the underbody blast environment for military safety applications. This will be done through model stability testing, validation against PMHS test experiments to ensure accurate metric predictions, and finally development of model specific injury risk curves. The outcome of this work will allow accurate model prediction of injury in the UBB environment.
subject
Finite Element
Injury
Injury Risk Curve
Lower extremity
Military
contributor
Gayzik, Francis S (committee chair)
Weaver, Ashley A (committee member)
Danelson, Kerry A (committee member)
Pintar, Frank A (committee member)
Masouros, Spyros (committee member)
date
2022-05-24T08:36:05Z (accessioned)
2022 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2024-05-23 (terms)
2024-05-23 (liftdate)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/100748 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Dissertation

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