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Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Familiarity with the Use of Non-Pharmacological Treatments For Chronic Low Back Pain in Adults

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title
Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Familiarity with the Use of Non-Pharmacological Treatments For Chronic Low Back Pain in Adults
author
Brooks, Amber
abstract
Low back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide with prevalence increasing in age. Primary care providers (PCPs) treat the majority of patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP). Historically, opioids were the most commonly prescribed treatment for cLBP. However, recent national evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of cLBP strongly recommend that patients be treated with a combination of non-opioid medications and non-pharmacologic treatments. Despite these evidence-based recommendations, there remain significant barriers to the routine use of non-pharmacological treatments for cLBP by PCPs. The purpose of this observational survey study was to provide an updated assessment of primary care providers’ knowledge, familiarity, likelihood of referral, and barriers to referral to pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for cLBP. The findings from this study help inform the next stage of investigation: development and implementation of clinically relevant tools to assist PCPs with delivering non-pharmacological treatment information to their patients with cLBP.
subject
Chronic Pain
Low Back Pain
Non-Pharmacological Treatments
Older Adults
contributor
Miller, David P (committee chair)
Suftin, Erin L (committee member)
Hurley, Robert W (committee member)
Wells, Brian J (committee member)
date
2022-05-24T08:36:06Z (accessioned)
2024-05-23T08:30:08Z (available)
2022 (issued)
degree
Clinical and Population Translational Sciences (discipline)
embargo
2024-05-23 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/100750 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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