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Framing the Co-Benefits of Carbon Mitigation: Examining the Role of Distributional Justice and Health in Guiding Political Attitudes And Behaviors

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title
Framing the Co-Benefits of Carbon Mitigation: Examining the Role of Distributional Justice and Health in Guiding Political Attitudes And Behaviors
author
Howley, Shannon
abstract
This experimental study investigates how framing carbon dioxide emissions and air pollution in terms of public health and distributional environmental justice influences support for climate mitigation policies and behavioral intentions toward climate change advocacy. This study provides a novel contribution to the climate framing scholarship by constructing and experimentally testing a distributional justice frame. Feelings of compassion and anger are examined to evaluate their role in guiding climate attitudes and behaviors. This study found no main effects from the public health frame or the distributional justice frame. Nonetheless, the perceived fairness of the outcomes of climate mitigation policies were significant predictors of climate policy support. A strong empirical association was found between supporting the principles of environmental justice and higher support for climate mitigation policies and climate advocacy behaviors.
subject
Air pollution
Climate Change
Distributional justice
Environmental justice
Framing effects
Public health
contributor
Kirby-Straker, Rowena (committee chair)
Krcmar, Marina (committee member)
Giles, Steven (committee member)
date
2022-05-24T08:36:10Z (accessioned)
2022-05-24T08:36:10Z (available)
2022 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/100761 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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