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EFFECT OF DIETARY WEIGHT LOSS, EXERCISE, AND DAY-LONG MOVEMENT ON SOCIAL COGNITIVE OUTCOMES, AND HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN OLDER ADULTS

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title
EFFECT OF DIETARY WEIGHT LOSS, EXERCISE, AND DAY-LONG MOVEMENT ON SOCIAL COGNITIVE OUTCOMES, AND HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN OLDER ADULTS
author
Furlipa, Joy
abstract
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between profiles of movement and key quality of life (QOL) and social cognitive theory (SCT) mediators of behavior change in older adults. Methods: Older adults (N=137; 70.0±4.4 years; 77.4% female; BMI=35.6±3.7) were randomized to one of three 6-month group mediated weight loss (WL) interventions: WL+structured treadmill-based aerobic exercise (EX); WL+a daily movement intervention (SitLess); WL+EX+SitLess. Questionnaires including the 36-item short form survey (SF-36), the satisfaction with function scale (SAT-F), the self-efficacy for walking scale (SEW) were collected at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Results: A series of mixed analyses of variance revealed no group x time interactions. There were significant and positive main effects for time for SEW (p<.001), SAT-F (p<.001), and several SF-36 subscales including physical function (p<.001), role limitations due to physical health (p=.004), energy/fatigue (p<.001), social functioning (p=.009), bodily pain (p=.041) and general health (p<.001). Conclusion: A group mediated intervention paired with either structured exercise or day-long movement produces similar improvements to key mediators of long-term behavior change.
subject
Daylong Movement
HRQOL
Older Adults
Physical Activity
Social Cognitive Theory
Weight Loss
contributor
Fanning, Jason T (committee chair)
Brubaker, Peter H (committee member)
Katula, Jeffrey A (committee member)
date
2022-07-11T19:17:46Z (accessioned)
2022-07-11T19:17:46Z (available)
2022 (issued)
degree
Health and Exercise Science (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/101031 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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