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DEVELOPMENT OF A FUNCTIONALIZED ENDOVASCULAR BIOMATERIAL TO PROVIDE HEMOCOMPATIBILITY AND ENDOTHELIUM FORMATION

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title
DEVELOPMENT OF A FUNCTIONALIZED ENDOVASCULAR BIOMATERIAL TO PROVIDE HEMOCOMPATIBILITY AND ENDOTHELIUM FORMATION
author
Wu, Yidi
abstract
There is an unmet clinical need for suitable prosthetic vascular graft materials in revascularization procedures. Many surface modification strategies have been developed to improve the long-term patency of the implants. However, preventing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia caused by poor hemocompatibility and the absence of a functional endothelium on prosthetic graft implants remains challenging. The ideal prosthetic vascular graft should be non-thrombogenic and rapidly endothelialized following intravascular use. It should support the growth of endogenous cells and induce the natural repair and regeneration response. More importantly, it should have similar viscoelastic properties as native vascular tissue. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that a viscoelastic material (termed PFC) composed of silk fibroin, type I collagen and poly (glycerol-sebacate) is mechanically durable, minimally thrombogenic and conducive to endothelial cell growth, and can be used to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) similar to vascular tissue ECM. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α) is a potent chemoattractant released during endothelial damage and induces the directional migration of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to promote vascular tissue repair. Syndecan-4 is a heparan sulfate (HS) containing proteoglycan with diverse oligosaccharide sequences serving as specific binding sites for over 400 signaling molecules including SDF-1α. In this study, PFC was used to evaluate a bio-functionalized layer composed of syndecan-4 and SDF-1α. The purpose of the study was to determine if functionalized PFC could be used as a hemocompatible scaffold material to create a local microenvironment conducive for EPC adhesion, growth, and differentiation. The results of the study provide valuable insights on the potential of using functionalized acellular biomaterial to promote endovascular tissue repair and regeneration.
subject
Biomaterials
Endothelial progenitor cells
Growth factors
Vascular tissue engineering
contributor
Wagner, William (committee chair)
Opara, Emmanuel (committee member)
Jordan, James (committee member)
Van Dyke, Mark (committee member)
Yazdani, Saami (committee member)
date
2022-09-17T08:35:43Z (accessioned)
2023-09-16T08:30:08Z (available)
2022 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2023-09-16 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/101254 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Dissertation

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