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Owen, Amy (Video interview)

History of Wake Forest University Oral Histories

Item Details

coverage
Winston-Salem (N.C.)
creator
Beverly, Parker
Owen, Amy
date
2022-10-06T14:55:02Z
2022-10-06T14:55:02Z
2022-06-21
2022-10-06 (issued)
description
Amy Owen graduated from Wake Forest University in 1983, double majoring in Sociology and Politics. Owen was a member of Strings, a social society for women. She recalls the rush process as being busy but relaxed considering pledges were not subjected to as many "intense" activities or parties. As a part of Strings, she learned about the women's field hockey team and eventually joined. At the time, the team was only a club team but they played historically competitive groups like UNC. While Title IX was enacted at the time, few women from Owen's high school played sports at the college level. In this interview, Amy Owen reflects on her time at the University, recalling fun memories with String sisters while also focusing on how much the school has changed in the years following her graduation.
format
video/mp4
42:20 minutes
Permalink
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/101369
language
English
relation
Special Collections and Archives
Z. Smith Reynolds Library
Wake Forest University
History of Wake Forest University Oral histories (RG53.1.2 )
rights
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Rights Statement
This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).
subject
Inclusive Student Life Collection
Summer 2022 Oral Histories
Wake Forest University--History
Strings
Women's history
Title IX
Field hockey
Greek letter societies
title
Owen, Amy (Video interview)
type
Moving Image

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