Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

ASSESSING THE GENETIC DIVERSITY BETWEEN AND WITHIN HOST POPULATIONS OF THE ROTAVIRUS A VP4 SPIKE PROTEIN

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

title
ASSESSING THE GENETIC DIVERSITY BETWEEN AND WITHIN HOST POPULATIONS OF THE ROTAVIRUS A VP4 SPIKE PROTEIN
author
mendoza, lizel
abstract
Attachment and entry into the host cell are essential functions for viruses. The spike protein must have variation in its surface proteins to avoid detection by the host immune system. Rotavirus VP4 spike proteins are incredibly diverse, and several studies have attempted to classify VP4 genotypes based on various molecular features and host factors (Liu et al., 2012; Jiang et al., 2017; Sun et al., 2021), yet no one has compared host populations to genotype diversity. Furthermore, connecting VP4 genetic diversity based on host type to functional evolution is not commonly studied. My study aims to explore these knowledge gaps by conducting a thorough assessment of VP4 genetic variation using genotypes 1-57. With bioinformatic tools, I found that P11 may be more divergent than the avian clade. In addition, VP5* is a conserved subunit but may provide additional insight into cell entry and recognition. Reliance on prior knowledge of VP5* has exposed the limited understanding we possess of VP5* and its diversity. Poor surveillance in certain regions and limited wild host species sampling paints an incomplete picture of RV prevalence, host tropism, and host susceptibility. Studying the spike protein diversity will help enlighten what forces perpetuate RV evolution. Furthermore, VP4 can also serve as a model for other researchers studying viruses and provide clinicians with valuable information on vaccine research and development.
subject
Evolution
Genetic Diversity
Population Genetics
RNA Virus
Rotavirus
Spike Protein
contributor
Pease, James B (advisor)
Anderson, David J (committee member)
McDonald Esstman, Sarah (committee member)
date
2023-07-25T17:48:37Z (accessioned)
2023-07-25T17:48:37Z (available)
2023 (issued)
degree
Biology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/102248 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

Usage Statistics