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CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL, ADAPTED MODEL OF ALCOHOL DRINKING DESPITE NEGATIVE CONSEQUENCE: THE MALADAPTIVE ALCOHOL SELF-ADMINISTRATION TASK

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title
CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL, ADAPTED MODEL OF ALCOHOL DRINKING DESPITE NEGATIVE CONSEQUENCE: THE MALADAPTIVE ALCOHOL SELF-ADMINISTRATION TASK
author
Carlson, Hannah Nicole
abstract
Despite the prevalence of alcohol use, only a subset of individuals develop alcohol use disorder (AUD). Continued use despite known social, occupational, and medical consequences is a prominent theme in the diagnostic criteria for AUD. Decades of research and theory have been dedicated to elucidating the factors precipitating transition from recreational to disordered drinking. Indeed, three prominent theories of addiction all attempt to rationalize the nature of this transition from behavioral, neurobiological, and clinical standpoints. Continued elucidation of this process requires the development and use of translational models with predictive and ecological validity that reliably measure behavior relevant to the human presentation of alcohol use. The maladaptive alcohol self-administration task (MAST) is a novel translational model of alcohol use despite negative consequences designed. The MAST is designed to simulate a spectrum of drinking-related behavior. Specifically, though prior models of individual resistance to alcohol-contingent consequences have offered a binary choice between punishment and abstinence, the MAST provides an option to drink in such a way that mitigates negative consequences. This behavior is translationally equivalent to recreational drinking that avoids significant loss of function. Thus, the MAST can capture changes in behavioral strategy that indicate a transition toward maladaptive drinking patterns. The present dissertation presents and characterizes the MAST as a viable translational model that expands on the existing framework of translational alcohol-related behavior. I demonstrate that both male and female rodents are capable of reliably acquiring and consistently performing the MAST for alcohol and non-alcohol solutions. I show that acute physiological manipulation, administration of yohimbine, can meaningfully alter behavior on the MAST. Additionally, I characterize differences in engagement, intake, and performance across training, acquisition and maintenance of the MAST for sucrose (“natural”), alcohol, and combined reinforcer solutions. Finally, I discuss the implications of this work in relation to existing translational models, three prominent theories of addiction, and ongoing research pursuits. I argue that the consideration of individual differences and change in behavior is of tantamount importance to progression of the field of alcohol research.
contributor
Weiner, Jeffrey L (advisor)
Maier, Joost (committee member)
Ferris, Mark (committee member)
Jones, Sara (committee member)
date
2023-07-25T17:48:45Z (accessioned)
2023 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience (discipline)
embargo
2024-06-06 (terms)
2024-06-06 (liftdate)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/102278 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Dissertation

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