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Compulsory Childhood Vaccination: Emotional Decisions, Ethical Issues, and Potential Solutions

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title
Compulsory Childhood Vaccination: Emotional Decisions, Ethical Issues, and Potential Solutions
author
Brendle, Jacob Carlyle
abstract
Addressing questions in the field of bioethics often involves engaging with various perspectives and drawing across multiple disciplines. The primary aim of this thesis is to discuss compulsory childhood vaccination, which is a controversial topic. To do so, I draw on multiple disciplines and engage with the various viewpoints of stakeholders. This thesis begins by covering the history of vaccination before discussing the legal context of vaccine mandates. This thesis also considers arguments voiced in support of and against compulsory childhood vaccination. Instead of taking a clear stance, although I am pro- vaccine, this project evaluates both the arguments for and against compulsory childhood vaccination, illustrating that both sides of this debate make genuine and thought-provoking arguments. Most importantly, this thesis covers the importance and impact of emotions in vaccine decision-making processes, and the project ends by offering some potential solutions that might encourage vaccine uptake in children, many of which appeal to the role of emotion. The goal of this thesis is not to have all of the answers, and I do not pretend that I do. Rather, it seeks to argue that compulsory vaccination is complicated – it is bound up in emotional decision-making and a variety of ethical arguments – but there are potential solutions to escape the tumultuous landscape we are in.
subject
Childhood
Compulsion
Decision-making
Emotions
Ethics
Vaccination
contributor
Iltis, Ana S (advisor)
Hall, Mark A (committee member)
Gengler, Amanda M (committee member)
date
2023-09-08T08:35:21Z (accessioned)
2023-09-08T08:35:21Z (available)
2023 (issued)
degree
Bioethics (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/102604 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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