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VIRTUALLY ENGAGING SOCIALLY WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

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title
VIRTUALLY ENGAGING SOCIALLY WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
author
Morton, David Braxton
abstract
Adults experience cognitive decline with age. Current literature suggests social connection and physical activity may preserve cognition. Still, the influence of social connection using various virtual media remains unknown. Low-active adults were randomized to engage in the same 4-week group-mediated activity program via either virtual reality (VR) or video conference (VC). To assess group differences in physical activity (PA), social connection (SC), and executive functioning (EF), a series of analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) were conducted. To evaluate whether PA and SC were associated with EF, we first conducted a series of Spearman correlations between PA, SC, and EF at baseline and longitudinally using residualized change scores. The VR group demonstrated moderate-sized benefits relative to those in VC group for inhibition and moderate-to-large effects on social connectedness. There was a medium-magnitude effect favoring VC for minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Social connection was associated with EF cross-sectionally and longitudinally, and MVPA was associated with EF longitudinally. These preliminary findings support that PA, SC, and EF are interrelated and that VR may help to enhance both SC and EF. Additional work is warranted to optimize VR delivery to enhance PA and to investigate long-term effects in a larger sample.
contributor
Burdette, Jonathan (advisor)
Fanning, Jason (committee member)
Ehlers, Diane (committee member)
date
2023-09-08T08:35:24Z (accessioned)
2023-09-08T08:35:24Z (available)
2023 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience – MS (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/102614 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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