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VIDEO GAMES DO KILL: WHITE SUPREMACIST ABEYANCE AND #GAMERGATE

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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title
VIDEO GAMES DO KILL: WHITE SUPREMACIST ABEYANCE AND #GAMERGATE
author
Walrath, Caitlin
abstract
The Internet has been rife with white supremacist activity since the late 1980s. Much of their presence has centered around online gaming spaces and mobilization of gamers to fulfill the political aims of white supremacists. However, scholarship on why and how the relationship between white supremacists and online gaming spaces developed is incredibly new. This thesis locates its inquiry within the aftermath of #GamerGate and the consequences for mass rhetorical mobilization of thousands of gamers in service of white supremacist movements. In this thesis, I will argue that harmonious relationship between gaming and white supremacist online spaces is a deliberate strategy of jumping in and out of social movement abeyance by white supremacists to sustain their rhetorical presence as a foundation for Internet discourse. Using a combination of Kenneth Burke’s theory of identification through the “Four Master Tropes” and Christian Lundberg’s psychoanalytic theory of “tropological economies”, this thesis explains why gamers desire participation in white supremacist rhetorical spaces and how their compulsion for agential expression sustains recruitment.
subject
abeyance
identification
tropes
video games
white supremacy
contributor
Watts, Eric K (advisor)
Cunningham, Phillip (committee member)
Marwick, Alice (committee member)
date
2024-05-23T08:35:53Z (accessioned)
2024-05-23T08:35:53Z (available)
2024 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/109400 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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