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DOES WEIGHTED VEST USE DURING INTENTIONAL WEIGHT LOSS INFLUENCE LONG-TERM WEIGHT LOSS MAINTENANCE? PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE ARTHRITIS PILOT FOR PRESERVING MUSCLE WHILE LOSING WEIGHT

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title
DOES WEIGHTED VEST USE DURING INTENTIONAL WEIGHT LOSS INFLUENCE LONG-TERM WEIGHT LOSS MAINTENANCE? PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE ARTHRITIS PILOT FOR PRESERVING MUSCLE WHILE LOSING WEIGHT
author
DeLong, Carson Nikole
abstract
PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this study was to explore whether gravitational loading during weight loss (WL) influences subsequent weight regain. METHODS: 18 older adults (70.4±3.1 years, 83% women, 78% white) living with obesity [body mass index (BMI): 35.2±2.8 kg/m2] participated in a 6-month WL intervention with a 24-month follow-up. Half (n=9) were assigned to caloric restriction plus 8 hours/day weighted vest use (WL+VEST) and half (n=9) were assigned to caloric restriction only (WL Only). Body weight and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were collected at baseline, 6, and 24 months. RESULTS: WL+VEST and WL Only participants lost significant and similar amounts of weight, at 6 months [WL+VEST: -11.2 kg (95% CI: -14.6, -7.7) vs WL Only: -10.3 kg (95% CI: -13.7, -6.8); p=0.71)]. By 24 months, the WL+VEST group regained approximately half of lost weight [-4.8 kg (95% CI: -9.6, 0.1)], while the WL Only group regained all lost weight [+0.9 kg (95% CI: -3.9, 5.8); p=0.10]. Change in RMR from 0-6 months was modestly and inversely associated with weight change from 6-24 months (r=-0.39, p=0.11). CONCLUSION: Pilot data signal weighted vest use during caloric restriction is associated with reduced weight regain, which may be driven by preserved RMR.
subject
Body Composition
Gravitostat
Obesity
Resting Metabolic Rate
Weight Loss
Weighted Vest
contributor
Beavers, Kristen M (advisor)
Beavers, Daniel P (committee member)
Fanning, Jason (committee member)
Nicklas, Barbara J (committee member)
date
2024-05-23T08:36:15Z (accessioned)
2024 (issued)
degree
Health and Exercise Science (discipline)
embargo
2026-05-22 (terms)
2026-05-22 (liftdate)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/109428 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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