Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Portrait of a Stereotype: Asian Americans' Experiences With the Model Minority Stereotype During Adolescence

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
Asian Americans are often characterized as intelligent, industrious, and reserved, an image called the model minority stereotype (MMS). Previous research linked Asian American youths’ perceptions of the MMS with positive academic and psychological outcomes. The current study extends these findings with a longitudinal follow-up on 152 Asian American adolescents’ MMS experiences. Results showed that MMS links with academic adjustment replicated at T2, while links with psychological functioning did not. The MMS was also found to predict social adjustment at T2. Longitudinal analyses showed the MMS predicted academic outcomes over time. Ethnic public regard and feelings about the MMS were found to moderate some associations. Overall, the MMS appears to be associated with positive and negative adjustment over time for Asian youth.
subject
model minority
racial/ethnic stereotyping
contributor
Thompson, Taylor L. (author)
Solano, Cecilia H. (committee chair)
Kiang, Lisa (committee member)
Buchanan, Christy M. (committee member)
Folmar, Steven J. (committee member)
date
2009-05-08T21:17:29Z (accessioned)
2010-06-18T18:57:10Z (accessioned)
2009-05-08T21:17:29Z (available)
2010-06-18T18:57:10Z (available)
2009-05-08T21:17:29Z (issued)
degree
Psychology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/14671 (uri)
language
en_US (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
rights
Release the entire work for access only to the Wake Forest University system for one year from the date below. After one year, release the entire work for access worldwide. (accessRights)
title
Portrait of a Stereotype: Asian Americans' Experiences With the Model Minority Stereotype During Adolescence
type
Thesis

Usage Statistics

 

Collection Options

Account Menu

If you have any questions, please contact Molly Keener, Director of Digital Initiatives & Scholarly Communication.