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Anti-Catholicism in the Eighteenth Century Novel

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abstract
Scholarship on anti-Catholicism in England abounds for the eras surrounding the eighteenth century, but for the eighteenth century itself, it remains limited. Of the research that does examine this period, the majority concerning literature pinpoints satire, poetry, sermons, and treatises as the key literary products and/or perpetrators of anti-Catholicism in England, while discourse on the novel is lacking. More specifically, the relationship between the evolutions of both anti-Catholicism and the novel genre has not been explored. The purpose of this thesis is to begin a discussion of that relationship, and while I cannot perform a comprehensive analysis of anti-Catholicism and the eighteenth century novel as a whole, I am presenting three examples – within Richardson’s The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Inchbald’s A Simple Story, and Lewis’s The Monk – which establish distinct connections between the developments of both the novel form and anti-Catholic ideas, in the hopes of opening doors for further study in this area.
subject
eighteenth century
novel
anti-catholicism
Lewis, Matthew
Richardson
Inchbald
contributor
Laughridge, Carrie Butler (author)
Kairoff, Claudia (committee chair)
Richard, Jessica (committee member)
Jacobson, Miriam (committee member)
date
2009-05-06T17:32:07Z (accessioned)
2010-06-18T18:57:51Z (accessioned)
2009-05-06T17:32:07Z (available)
2010-06-18T18:57:51Z (available)
2009-05-06T17:32:07Z (issued)
degree
English (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/14722 (uri)
language
en_US (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
rights
Release the entire work for access only to the Wake Forest University system for one year from the date below. After one year, release the entire work for access worldwide. (accessRights)
title
Anti-Catholicism in the Eighteenth Century Novel
type
Thesis

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