Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Defining Affective Working Memory

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
Some recent studies of working memory have led to the proposal of a new WM maintenance component specialized for maintaining emotions. The crux of the evidence for affective WM is the finding of differential selective interference effects on the maintenance of negative emotions compared to the maintenance of visuospatial information (Mikels & Reuter-Lorenz, in press). This study sought to replicate and extend the selective interference effects shown previously by examining the effects on positive emotion maintenance, in order to further elucidate the defining characteristics of affective WM. It is hypothesized that affective WM consists of a single affective-arousal maintenance component, as opposed to valence-specific maintenance sub-components. Also, it is hypothesized that emotions are subject to automatic reappraisal processes during rehearsal, which modify the emotional intensity from its originally elicited state. Consistent with the hypothesis, the present results indicate that the affective WM maintenance component is a single buffer. Both negative and positive emotion maintenance were similarly impaired by concurrent negative and positive emotion-regulation tasks, as compared to maintenance task-only performance. Furthermore, a concurrent cognitive task facilitated positive and negative emotion maintenance, indicating that automatic reappraisal processes were prevented from occurring when cognitive resources were already consumed.
subject
emotion
working memory
contributor
DeFraine, William (author)
Blumenthal, Terry (committee chair)
Jennings, Janine (committee member)
Stanford, Terrence (committee member)
Dagenbach, Dale (committee member)
date
2009-05-08T21:05:36Z (accessioned)
2010-06-18T18:58:16Z (accessioned)
2009-05-08T21:05:36Z (available)
2010-06-18T18:58:16Z (available)
2009-05-08T21:05:36Z (issued)
degree
Psychology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/14747 (uri)
language
en_US (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
rights
Release the entire work for access only to the Wake Forest University system for one year from the date below. After one year, release the entire work for access worldwide. (accessRights)
title
Defining Affective Working Memory
type
Thesis

Usage Statistics