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In the Eye of the Beholder: Perceptions of Compensation Mediate the Effects of Attachment Style and Transgression Severity on Relationship Satisfaction

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title
In the Eye of the Beholder: Perceptions of Compensation Mediate the Effects of Attachment Style and Transgression Severity on Relationship Satisfaction
author
Leary, Kevin
abstract
A considerable amount of research has been undertaken in the investigation of processes that determine people’s satisfaction with their interpersonal and romantic relationships. The current research was conducted in order to examine the role of a romantic partner’s compensatory behaviors in influencing relationship satisfaction as well as examine the role of attachment style in moderating these effects. Compensatory behaviors were conceptualized as acts that are intended to make-up for transgressions or negative events that occur between relationship partners. The primary hypothesis investigated in this study contended that attachment style would predict ratings of transgression severity which would, in turn, determine the perceptions of how well a compensatory behavior made up for that transgression. The perception of compensation adequacy, then, would ultimately mediate the effects of a transgression on relationship satisfaction. A series of hierarchical multiple regression were conducted in order to investigate the relationships among the attachment styles and ratings of transgression severity, perceptions of compensation, and satisfaction.
subject
attachment
satisfaction
transgression
compensation
forgiveness
romantic relationships
contributor
Fleeson, Will (committee chair)
Seta, Catherine (committee member)
Kiang, Lisa (committee member)
Newsome, Deborah (committee member)
date
2009-05-08T17:54:36Z (accessioned)
2010-06-18T18:58:19Z (accessioned)
2009-05-08T17:54:36Z (available)
2010-06-18T18:58:19Z (available)
2009-05-08T17:54:36Z (issued)
degree
Psychology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/14752 (uri)
language
en_US (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
rights
Release the entire work for access only to the Wake Forest University system for one year from the date below. After one year, release the entire work for access worldwide. (accessRights)
type
Thesis

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