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John Adams and France: A Remarkable but Costly Relationship

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abstract
On March 4, 1797, John Adams was inaugurated second President of the United States in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was preceded by President George Washington, who had served two terms in office. George Washington was elected by popular acclamation due to his military leadership in the Revolutionary War. John Adams was narrowly elected and had little popular support such as had been evident in the Washington Administration for two terms. John Adams stood up for his beliefs and was willing to absorb the consequences of his actions. A staunch patriot Adams would not compromise his belief that the United States should become an independent nation. He also developed diplomatic skills and assisted the United States in gaining key recognition from Holland. As President, Adams steered the nation through turmoil and kept the nation out of a war it could not afford. Many of his contemporaries labeled Adams as being mentally unbalanced, but he achieved most of the goals he pursued with little or no support.
subject
presidents
diplomatic relations
contributor
McCreary, Larry (author)
Frey, Donald (committee chair)
Frey, Donald (committee member)
Coates, David (committee member)
Hendricks, Ed (committee member)
date
2009-12-08T15:42:29Z (accessioned)
2010-06-18T18:58:31Z (accessioned)
2009-12-08T15:42:29Z (available)
2010-06-18T18:58:31Z (available)
2009-12-08T15:42:29Z (issued)
degree
MALS (Liberal Studies) (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/14771 (uri)
language
en_US (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
rights
Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide. (accessRights)
title
John Adams and France: A Remarkable but Costly Relationship
type
Thesis

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