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Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy in Extremely Low Gestational Age Neonates

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abstract
Sepsis in premature infants is associated with long term adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. There have been no previous studies to assess the acute changes in brain function during sepsis that may lead to long term adverse neurologic outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify acute changes in brain function during sepsis in premature infants through the use of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG). This study was a prospective observational study of 108 premature infants born at less than 28 weeks gestation. aEEG recordings were performed once monthly until 36 weeks postmenstrual age or discharge as well as an additional aEEG recording during their first episode of sepsis. All recordings were assessed for the presence of burst suppression and a maturition score was assigned. Burst suppression occurred more frequently during acute sepsis (OR 2.4, p=0.01), but the rate of aEEG maturation was not different between infants with and without sepsis. We conclude that sepsis is associated with acute encephalopathy, but does not alter the rate of brain wave maturation.
subject
sepsis
neonates
contributor
Helderman, Jennifer (author)
Poehling, Katherine (committee chair)
O'Shea, T. Michael (committee member)
Leng, Iris (committee member)
Santos, Cesar (committee member)
date
2009-08-07T14:13:06Z (accessioned)
2010-06-18T19:00:03Z (accessioned)
2009-08-07T14:13:06Z (available)
2010-06-18T19:00:03Z (available)
2009-08-07T14:13:06Z (issued)
degree
Clinical Epidemiology & Health Services (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/14918 (uri)
language
en_US (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
rights
Release the entire work for access only to the Wake Forest University system for one year from the date below. After one year, release the entire work for access worldwide. (accessRights)
title
Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy in Extremely Low Gestational Age Neonates
type
Thesis

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