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Fair Treatment? African-American Presence at International Expositions in the South, 1884 - 1902

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abstract
The South hosted four major international expositions between 1884 and 1902 in New Orleans, Atlanta, Nashville, and Charleston. African Americans were granted a surprisingly high level of recognition at these fairs given their status as second-class citizens, and the rise of Jim Crow, disfranchisement, and racial violence during this time period. This study examines the details of African-American presence and representation at each of these fairs and how the changing state of race relations in the South at the turn of the century influenced interactions between blacks and whites at the expositions.
subject
African American
Atlanta
international exposition
Nashville
New Orleans
world's fair
contributor
Cromwell, Sara S. (author)
Parent, Anthony S (committee chair)
Simonelli, Jeanne M (committee member)
Hayes, John (committee member)
date
2011-02-16T21:42:14Z (accessioned)
2011-02-16T21:42:14Z (available)
2010 (issued)
degree
Liberal Studies (MALS) (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/30396 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Fair Treatment? African-American Presence at International Expositions in the South, 1884 - 1902
type
Thesis

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