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DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC METHODOLOGIES TOWARDS CYCLIC HYDROXAMIC ACID-BASED NATURAL PRODUCTS

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title
DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC METHODOLOGIES TOWARDS CYCLIC HYDROXAMIC ACID-BASED NATURAL PRODUCTS
author
Banerjee, Ranjan
abstract
Hydroxamic acids are an important class of bioactive compounds with wide uses as anti-bacterial, or anti-inflammatory agents and a key component of many natural products, mainly siderophores (low-molecular-weight iron sequestering agents) in lower organisms. Hydroxamic acid based analogs may find potential therapeutic uses in the inhibition of siderophore biosynthesis. Our research targets to develop new synthetic methodology towards making cyclic hydroxamic acids in a stereoselective and regioselective fashion. Basic decomposition of Piloty's acid transforms cyclic ketones (mainly four and five membered) into ring-expanded cyclic hydroxamic acids in 20-69% yield (Scheme 1). Mechanistic study reveals this reaction involves a C-nitroso intermediate 98 (Scheme 47) in the course of the rearrangement, which can also be generated by a separate hydrolysis reaction of acyloxy nitroso intermediate 103 (Scheme 51) leading to the ring-expansion product in 75-80% yield.
subject
Cobactine and Mycobactic Acid
Cyclic Hydroxamic Acid
Hydrolysis of five membered ring acyloxy nitroso compound yields hydroxamic acid
Intermolecular nitroso-ene method to make linear
cyclic and long-chain hydroxamic acid
Intramolecular nitroso-ene method to make eight member ring hydroxamic acid
-NOH insertion into cyclic ketones in a regioselective and steroselctive fashion
contributor
King, Stephen Bruce (committee chair)
Garg, Pradeep K (committee member)
Alexander, Rebecca W (committee member)
Colyer, Christa L (committee member)
Jones, Paul B (committee member)
date
2011-02-16T21:42:36Z (accessioned)
2012-12-14T09:30:08Z (available)
2010 (issued)
degree
Chemistry (discipline)
embargo
2012-12-14 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/30428 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Dissertation

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