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THE EFFECTS OF AGE, GH AND IGF-1 ON NEUROMUSCULAR RECOVERY FOLLOWING NERVE TRANSECTION

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abstract
Age is the single most important determinant of recovery after peripheral nerve injury. With aging, there is a decrease in circulating levels of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like-growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of age, GH and IGF-1 on neuromuscular recovery after peripheral nerve injury in aged rats. It was found that with aging, there is a significant impairment in neuromuscular recovery after peripheral nerve injury and repair. There was a significant impairment in the response of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) to peripheral nerve injury. Using a dwarf rat model of GH-deficiency, it was found that a lack of circulating GH does not lead to impairments in neuromuscular recovery after nerve injury. Replenishment of GH in aged or GH-deficient rats does not affect neuromuscular recovery. Lastly, it was found that IGF-1, locally-delivered to the site of the regenerating nerve, improved neuromuscular recovery after injury in aged rats. Overall, these results emphasize the role of the NMJ in age-related decline in neuromuscular recovery after peripheral nerve injury and suggest that alterations in local regenerative mechanisms are more important than changes in the systemic GH-IGF-1 axis.
subject
Aging
Nerve
Nerve injury
Neuromuscular junction
Rats
contributor
Apel, Peter J. (author)
Delbono, Osvaldo (committee chair)
Li, Zhongyu (committee member)
Koman, L A (committee member)
Oppenheim, Ronald (committee member)
Smith, Thomas L (committee member)
Sonntag, William E (committee member)
date
2011-07-14T20:34:48Z (accessioned)
2011-07-14T20:34:48Z (available)
2011 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/33416 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
THE EFFECTS OF AGE, GH AND IGF-1 ON NEUROMUSCULAR RECOVERY FOLLOWING NERVE TRANSECTION
type
Dissertation

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