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Examining Grey's Anatomy: A Content Analysis of Elements of Medical School Communication Reform in a Popular Medical Drama

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title
Examining Grey's Anatomy: A Content Analysis of Elements of Medical School Communication Reform in a Popular Medical Drama
author
Lacko, Hannah Strong
abstract
This thesis explored the portrayal of medical school communication education reform (specifically the Common Ground Instrument), in a current, top-rated American medical drama. Manifest and latent content analysis was used in combination with qualitative theme analysis to analyze 20 episodes of Grey's Anatomy. Manifest content analysis revealed the presence of all six skills cited in the Common Ground Instrument: (1) rapport building, (2) agenda setting, (3) information management, (4) active listening, (5) addressing feelings, and (6) negotiation. Latent content analysis revealed multiple themes attributed to the presence or absence of each of the six skills, including: (1) the initiation of rapport building, (2) types of agenda setting, (3) managing information through statements, (4) passive observation, (5) reasons patient feelings were not addressed, and (6) the most commonly used tools for negotiation. Qualitative theme analysis revealed the following five implications: (1) influence of family members, (2) influence of physician bias, (3) statements vs. questions, (4) passive observation, and (5) communication as a process. Implications of Grey's Anatomy viewership are discussed in terms of Entertainment Education, Cultivation Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Health Belief Model.
subject
Common Ground Instrument
Cultivation Theory
Entertainment Education
Health communication
physician-patient interaction
Social Cognitive Theory
contributor
Giles, Steven (committee chair)
Petrocelli, John (committee member)
date
2011-07-14T20:35:07Z (accessioned)
2011-07-14T20:35:07Z (available)
2011 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/33428 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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