Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Understanding the Role of Dendritic Cell Subsets in the Generation of a CD8+ T Cell Response Following Pulmonary Vaccinia Viral Infection

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

title
Understanding the Role of Dendritic Cell Subsets in the Generation of a CD8+ T Cell Response Following Pulmonary Vaccinia Viral Infection
author
Beauchamp, Nicole
abstract
Unlike many other tissues, the lung is constantly assaulted with foreign antigens, both environmental and infectious. This includes a large number of viruses which spread via aerosolized droplets. In order for the body to mount an adaptive immune response to a pathogen, T cells circulating through lymph nodes (LN) must be alerted to the presence of infection in the periphery. This occurs as a result of presentation of pathogen derived epitopes on professional antigen presenting cells (APC), primarily dendritic cells (DC). While an important role for dendritic cells (DC) as the activators of naive T cells is clear, the contribution of distinct DC subsets in this process is less understood. Multiple DC subsets are present within the lung tissue (CD103+ DC and CD11b+ DC) and draining lymph nodes (MLN) (CD8α+), and as such, all are potential regulators of T cell activation (for review see1,2). These studies sought to understand how DC subsets contribute to the generation of virus-specific CD8+ T cells following pulmonary viral infection.
subject
CD8 T cells
dendritic cells
lung
mouse
respiratory infection
vaccinia virus
contributor
Alexander-Miller, Martha A (committee chair)
Grayson, Jason (committee member)
Parks, Griffith (committee member)
High, Kevin (committee member)
Hiltbold-Schwartz, Elizabeth (committee member)
Barton, Erik (committee member)
date
2011-07-14T20:36:31Z (accessioned)
2012-07-14T08:30:19Z (available)
2011 (issued)
degree
Molecular Medicine and Translational Science (discipline)
embargo
2012-07-14 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/33501 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Dissertation

Usage Statistics