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Alterations of the Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor System Following Early Life Stress and Ethanol Self-Administration in Rhesus Monkeys

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abstract
Early life stress (ELS) alters brain and neuroendocrine development leading to a higher risk of alcohol abuse. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a primary mediator of the stress response in the brain, plays a regulatory role in ethanol (EtOH) consumption. The goal of this thesis was to identify how ELS and EtOH drinking affected hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and CRH receptor binding. We used an accepted ELS model of maternal separation with nursery-reared (NR) and mother-reared rhesus monkeys induced to self-administer EtOH or control solution for over 12 months. Subjects underwent endocrine challenges to probe the HPA axis before and after drinking. Brains were processed for in vitro receptor autoradiography using [125I] Sauvagine and appropriate blockers to measure CRH receptor binding.
subject
Alcohol
CRF
CRH
Non-human Primates
Receptor Binding
Self-Administration
contributor
Trimnal, Megan Waddell (author)
Friedman, David P (committee chair)
McCool, Brian A (committee member)
date
2011-09-08T08:35:39Z (accessioned)
2011-09-08T08:35:39Z (available)
2011 (issued)
degree
Physiology and Pharmacology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/36140 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Alterations of the Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor System Following Early Life Stress and Ethanol Self-Administration in Rhesus Monkeys
type
Thesis

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