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Oxygen Generating Materials for Tissue Restoration and Regeneration

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abstract
Traumatic injury to skeletal muscle produces a physiological deficit resulting in deterioration of tissue structure and function. The restoration or regeneration (i.e., tissue engineering) technologies required to effectively treat these injuries would benefit from provision of oxygen in situations where the vascular supply is acutely or more chronically compromised. To this end, this work pursued the utilization of a novel class of oxygen generating biomaterials in influencing skeletal muscle physiology. The goal of this effort was to characterize, develop, and test the effectiveness of oxygen generating biomaterials on hypoxic/ischemic skeletal muscle cells and tissue, to be used as a platform for evaluating the feasibility of this approach. Materials were characterized in vitro for biocompatibility and oxygen generating kinetics. Simultaneously, oxygen consumption rates of muscle cells were quantified. A therapeutic range of biomaterials was established which would meet the oxygen demand of skeletal muscle cells in culture. For investigation of the utility of these compounds for tissue repair and replacement, an in vitro study was performed to define the oxygen demands specific to skeletal muscle tissue under hypoxic conditions in a physiological organ bath system. Functional, histological and homeostatic parameters were all monitored. These studies documented that the presence of oxygen generating biomaterials prevented an otherwise irrecoverable loss of muscle function under hypoxic conditions. Evaluation of the material in vivo was performed in a rat model of hindlimb ischemia, creating an oxygen deficit in the leg muscles. Short-term functional and histological assessments established the effectiveness of the material in an environment with little to no vascular supply, which would normally become necrotic. This initial work provides an important proof of concept for the feasibility of this technology platform in the preservation of skeletal muscle function and structure under hypoxic conditions in vitro and in vivo. These studies documented that the presence of oxygen generating biomaterials prevented an otherwise irrecoverable loss of muscle function under hypoxic conditions.
subject
ischemia
oxygen consumption
oxygen diffusion
peroxide
tissue salvage
contributor
Ward, Catherine Lindsey (author)
Harrison, Benjamin S (committee chair)
Christ, George J (committee member)
Van Dyke, Mark E (committee member)
Saul, Justin M (committee member)
Yoo, James J (committee member)
date
2011-09-08T08:36:13Z (accessioned)
2013-09-08T08:30:10Z (available)
2011 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2013-09-08 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/36166 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Oxygen Generating Materials for Tissue Restoration and Regeneration
type
Dissertation

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