Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

EXPERIENCE-DEPENDENT STRUCTURAL PLASTICITY IN A NATURALLY BEHAVING ANIMAL MODEL

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
The ability to adjust to changing environments is critical for an animal's survival. Neurons can undergo structural changes, such as branch addition, branch retraction, or altering the number or shape of spines which change the neural connectivity in the brain. The regulation of a neuron's structure may lead to changes in future behavior via altered processing of sensory stimuli. The following chapters of this dissertation are aimed at identifying signaling pathways that control structural plasticity in the Kenyon cells of the worker honey bee brain correlated with foraging experience and identify how those changes affect honey bee behavior. The honey bee model offers an opportunity to study a naturally occurring behavior while controlling age and experience of the individual studied.
subject
acetylcholine
apis mellifera
golgi
PER
Rho GTPase
contributor
Dobrin, Scott Eric (author)
Fahrbach, Susan E (committee chair)
McHaffie, John G (committee member)
Oppenheim, Ronald (committee member)
Milligan, Carol E (committee member)
Riddle, David R (committee member)
date
2012-01-18T09:35:25Z (accessioned)
2012-01-18T09:35:25Z (available)
2011 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/36418 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
EXPERIENCE-DEPENDENT STRUCTURAL PLASTICITY IN A NATURALLY BEHAVING ANIMAL MODEL
type
Dissertation

Usage Statistics