Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Behavioral Pharmacological Analysis of Deep Brain Stimulation Following Nerve Injury

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
Treatment of neuropathic pain remains a major unmet public health problem. Serious concerns arise over misuse of prescription opioids in chronic pain patients, a drug class representing the fastest growing substance abuse problem in the United States. Ascending pain pathways overlap significantly with limbic regions involved in reward and reinforcement, therefore pain and reward systems substantially interact and modulate one another. The extent to which pain modulates mesolimbic dopamine systems and thereby alters the reinforcing and abuse-related effects of opioids is not fully understood. The ability of pain relief to produce reinforcement in and of itself through modulation of this circuitry is also unknown.
subject
contributor
Ewan, Eric Edward (author)
Martin, Thomas J (committee chair)
Eisenach, James C (committee member)
Childers, Steven R (committee member)
Coghill, Robert C (committee member)
Rauck, Richard L (committee member)
Roberts, David C (committee member)
date
2012-01-18T09:35:36Z (accessioned)
2012-07-18T08:30:16Z (available)
2011 (issued)
degree
Physiology and Pharmacology (discipline)
embargo
2012-07-18 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/36445 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Behavioral Pharmacological Analysis of Deep Brain Stimulation Following Nerve Injury
type
Dissertation

Usage Statistics