Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Chemical Castration: How a Medical Therapy Became Punishment and the Bioethical Imperative to Return to a Rehabilitative Model for Sex Offenders

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

title
Chemical Castration: How a Medical Therapy Became Punishment and the Bioethical Imperative to Return to a Rehabilitative Model for Sex Offenders
author
Vaillancourt, Samantha Pandick
abstract
Chemical castration is a colloquial term used to refer to the treatment of certain sex offenders with antiandrogenic drugs in order to reduce recidivism. The use of this treatment began in the United States in 1966, at which time the nation favored a rehabilitative approach to criminal justice. In its first thirty years of use, chemical castration proved effective at reducing recidivism rates among one subset of offenders, paraphiliacs, by about fifty percent.
subject
Bioethics
Chemical castration
contributor
Coughlin, Christine N (committee chair)
King, Nancy M P (committee member)
Iltis, Ana S (committee member)
date
2013-01-09T09:35:13Z (accessioned)
2013-01-09T09:35:13Z (available)
2012 (issued)
degree
Bioethics (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/37658 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

Usage Statistics