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The Deaf Community and Accessible Website Design: How User-Friendliness Augments Organizational Legitimacy

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abstract
This study examines the accessibility of the Internet for members of the deaf/hard-of-hearing (D/HH) community, an overlooked population in mainstream society. Fifty adult participants, with and without documented hearing loss, were recruited from several audiology and otolaryngology practices in the southeastern United States and from community centers in the same region. Participants were instructed to navigate one of three versions of a website developed for the experiment. The versions were structured to reflect three levels of accessibility: minimal, moderate, and high. Based on their experiences, respondents were asked to provide their ratings of Web accessibility and their evaluations of the organization featured on the website. Ratings of Web accessibility were found to significantly predict participants' impressions of the organization, and higher Web accessibility was associated with individuals' willingness to support the institution.
subject
Accessibility
Deaf
Hearing
Internet
Marketing
Website
contributor
Mallary, Kevin J. (author)
Llewellyn, John (committee chair)
Louden, Allan (committee member)
Mitra, Ananda (committee member)
Bridges, Sheri (committee member)
date
2013-06-06T21:19:33Z (accessioned)
2013 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
10000-01-01 (liftdate)
embargo
forever (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/38551 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
The Deaf Community and Accessible Website Design: How User-Friendliness Augments Organizational Legitimacy
type
Thesis

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