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The Importance of Fog for Carbon Gain, Water Balance, and Foliar Uptake in Southern Appalachian Cloud Forests

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title
The Importance of Fog for Carbon Gain, Water Balance, and Foliar Uptake in Southern Appalachian Cloud Forests
author
Berry, Z. Carter
abstract
Numerous species and communities around the world are functionally linked to frequent cloud immersion including the coastal forests of the Pacific Northwest (USA), the Loma vegetation of Andean Peru, the coffee forests of Angola, and the relic spruce-fir communities of the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA. In these climates cloud immersion can provide an important subsidy of moisture that can improve plant water relations as well as photosynthetic status through alleviation of high sunlight and temperature stress. However, leaf wetting events can negatively affect carbon uptake by blocking stomatal pores, inhibiting CO2 exchange. Thus, in the southern Appalachian cloud forest ecosystem, the effects of cloud immersion on whole plant physiological ecology, including carbon uptake and water balance needed to be examined.
subject
fog
foliar uptake
Fraser fir
physiological ecology
red spruce
southern Appalachians
contributor
Smith, William K. (committee chair)
Anderson, T. Michael (committee member)
Horton, Jonathan (committee member)
Kron, Kathleen A. (committee member)
Silman, Miles R. (committee member)
date
2014-07-10T08:35:33Z (accessioned)
2015-07-10T08:30:11Z (available)
2014 (issued)
degree
Biology (discipline)
embargo
2015-07-10 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/39278 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Dissertation

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