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Dispensationalism, Islamophobia, and the Mass Media in America

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abstract
This thesis argues that Christian dispensationalist theology has played a major role in promoting and sustaining the anti-Islam discourse, often referred to as Islamophobia, in the media and among the mainstream American populace. Islamophobia is best understood as an othering discourse which creates a stark "us/them" dichotomy in which Muslims represent "them." Othering is also a major component of Christian dispensationalism since it too produces an extreme dualistic worldview. Dispensationalists typically read current geo-political events into the Bible aiming to identify a group of people or region from which the Antichrist and his allies will emerge, thus providing the primary "other." The attacks of 9/11 have served as a catalyst in shifting the focus from the Soviet Union and communism to Islam and the Middle East. Since 9/11, dispensationalists have established themselves as credible "experts" and "insiders" in the media and have subsequently been instrumental in promoting anti-Islam ideology. This study examines the ways in which this has been accomplished.
subject
anti-Islam
Christian fundamentalism
dispensationalism
Islamophobia
mass media
othering discourse
contributor
Smith, Christopher Cameron (author)
van Doorn-Harder, Nelly (committee chair)
Foskett, Mary F (committee member)
Leonard, Bill J (committee member)
date
2014-07-10T08:35:33Z (accessioned)
2018-10-31 (available)
2014 (issued)
degree
Religion (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/39279 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Dispensationalism, Islamophobia, and the Mass Media in America
type
Thesis

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