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The Impact of the Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) Intervention on Measures of Self-Efficacy

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title
The Impact of the Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) Intervention on Measures of Self-Efficacy
author
Dotson, Heidi Susan
abstract
Although numerous diabetes prevention translational studies (DPPLI) have demonstrated weight loss effects, no studies have yet examined the theoretical mechanisms involved in those effects. The purpose of this study is to examine self-efficacy changes between groups across the 24-month HELP PD trial. The hypothesis is that the lifestyle weight loss (LWL) group will show greater changes than the usual care control (UCC) group at each time point for both measures of self-efficacy. HELP PD randomized 301 participants to either a community-based, community health worker (CHW)-led DPPLI translational LWL intervention, which was designed based on self-efficacy theory, or a UCC. Self-efficacy was measured using weight efficacy lifestyle, and task specific exercise self-efficacy. ANCOVAs show that for both measures the LWL significantly increased from baseline to 6 months (ΔWEL p= 0.000) (ΔexSE p=0.000) and 12 months (ΔWEL p= 0.007) (ΔexSE p= 0.000) compared to the UCC, but there were no significant differences between groups from baseline to 24 months (ΔWEL p= 0.121) (ΔexSE p= 0.505). Limitations include: uncontrolled moderators and an inability to determine which sources of self-efficacy were impacted by the intervention. These findings show that CHW-led, social cognitively-based DPPLI translation studies can target and influence self-efficacy.
subject
Diabetes
Diabetes Prevention Program
Exercise Self-Efficacy
Self-Efficacy
Weight Efficacy Lifestyle
Weight Loss
contributor
Katula, Jeffrey A (committee chair)
Katula, Jeffrey A (committee member)
Mihalko, Shannon L (committee member)
Brubaker, Peter H (committee member)
date
2014-07-10T08:35:33Z (accessioned)
2015-07-10T08:30:09Z (available)
2014 (issued)
degree
Health and Exercise Science (discipline)
embargo
2015-07-10 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/39282 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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