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Exploring the Polyvocal Leadership Problem in the Pro-Life Movement: The Case of Rush Limbaugh and Sandra Fluke

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abstract
This thesis focuses on examining the statements that Rush Limbaugh's made regarding Sandra Fluke following her Congressional testimony on the Conscience Clause in February of 2012. In particular, I investigate the way that Rush Limbaugh's statements, and their subsequent circulation, made him a leader within the pro-life movement. Particularly, I problematize what I call the "polyvocal leadership problem" that occurs in social movements that lack a centralized leadership. I apply Kenneth Burke's work on identification and vilification in order to examine the ways that Limbaugh ruptures the "pro-woman" frame forwarded by other members of the pro-life movement. I begin by discussing the "polyvocal leadership problem" as it relates to social movements in the digital age. I next examine the way that Limbaugh's deployment of vilification rhetoric demonstrates the problem of polyvocality in social movements. I conclude with a discussion about the relevance of political punditry in public policy.
subject
Fluke
Leadership
Limbaugh
Pro-Life
Social Movements
Vilification
contributor
Moczulski, Leah Amelia (author)
Beasley-Von Burg, Alessandra (committee chair)
Dalton, Mary (committee member)
Zulick, Margret (committee member)
date
2014-07-10T08:35:35Z (accessioned)
2014-07-10T08:35:35Z (available)
2014 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/39288 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Exploring the Polyvocal Leadership Problem in the Pro-Life Movement: The Case of Rush Limbaugh and Sandra Fluke
type
Thesis

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