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Maya Spiritual Praxis in the New Baktun: Ritual and Reclamation in 21st Century Chiapas

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abstract
The Maya are-- spiritually -- the Children of the Maize. The far-reaching effects of the divorce between indigenous land-working Maya and their ability to rely on maize farming and traditional subsistence strategies on the milpa (a type of multi-crop, cooperative growing field) have implications for the continuity of Maya spiritual practice. In recent years, Maya communities have struggled against free trade policies and federal legislation that denies them land rights and productive autonomy. Presently, the younger generations in Chiapas are struggling to re-claim their spiritual beliefs as connected to community ecology.
subject
Baktun
Environment
Indigenous
Maya
Spiritual Ecology
Zapatista
contributor
Cavagnaro, Kellie (author)
Simonelli, Jeanne (committee chair)
Johnston, Lucas (committee member)
date
2014-07-10T08:35:42Z (accessioned)
2016-07-10T08:30:12Z (available)
2014 (issued)
degree
Liberal Studies (discipline)
embargo
2016-07-10 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/39324 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Maya Spiritual Praxis in the New Baktun: Ritual and Reclamation in 21st Century Chiapas
type
Thesis

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