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Interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis in polymicrobial communities affect antimicrobial resistance and survival in vivo

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abstract
Otitis media is an extremely common pediatric disease affecting millions of children each year worldwide. The three leading pathogens associated with this disease are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The initial step in the development of otitis media is nasopharyngeal colonization. The next step involves ascension through the Eustachian tube to access the middle ear space. For persistance within their host, it has been hypothesized that these bacteria are able to form biofilms on the mucosal epithelial cell surface. Recent studies have shown that these bacteria not only form biofilms in the middle ears of patients and experimentally infected animals with otitis media, but these surface-attached communities may contain multiple species of bacteria. Within a polymicrobial biofilm, the bacteria are able to share certain resources, including metabolic byproducts, virulence factors, and signaling molecules. Prior studies in the lab have shown that beta-lactamase production and quorum sensing play important roles in polymicrobial biofilms with S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, and M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae, respectively. In these studies, the importance of both beta-lactamase and interspecies quorum signal in polymicrobial biofilms with S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis was assessed using in vitro and in vivo models.
subject
biofilm
otitis media
pathogenesis
pneumococcus
polymicrobial
quorum sensing
contributor
Perez, Antonia Courtney (author)
Swords, William E (committee chair)
High, Kevin P (committee member)
Alexander-Miller, Martha (committee member)
Haas, Karen M (committee member)
Ornelles, David (committee member)
Reid, Sean D (committee member)
date
2014-07-10T08:35:44Z (accessioned)
2014-07-10T08:35:44Z (available)
2014 (issued)
degree
Microbiology & Immunology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/39331 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis in polymicrobial communities affect antimicrobial resistance and survival in vivo
type
Dissertation

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