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Big Data and the Rhetorical Narrative

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abstract
This project effectively illustrates a tactic by which the constructs of narrative inquiry from a humanist perspective, in particular the rhetorical narrative tradition, can migrate into a larger methodology while simultaneously recognizing and training agents in narrative visualization via up-to-date computational tools. The Reddit platform in particular, served as a suitable illustration for a multifaceted approach to novel methods in narrative inquiry due to the free accessibility to online storytelling in addition to a substantial collection of unstructured data it offers. This permitted an effective exploration through means of analyzing mediated narratives while concurrently using computational methods to assemble, filter, and interpret "Reddit narratives." The project progresses in two parts. First I offer a model for contemporary rhetorical narrative analysis that embraces social media as a viable source of user-generated narrative data. The second half of the project illustrates a data analysis template that employs a rhetorical lens for the creation of narrative maps. Collectively this project proposes a model for continued rhetorical narrative inquiry that intersects at traditional qualitative analysis and the contemporary deployment of textual analytic software.
subject
Big Data
Data Visualization
Multiple Methods
Narrative Mapping
Reddit
Rhetorical Narrative
contributor
Bowling, Roy Nathaniel (author)
Zulick, Margaret D (committee chair)
Mitra, Ananda (committee member)
date
2015-01-21T09:35:15Z (accessioned)
2015-11-20T09:30:10Z (available)
2014 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
embargo
forever [N.B. Embargo lifted 11-19-2015 by Molly Keener, per author's request.] (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/47448 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Big Data and the Rhetorical Narrative
type
Thesis

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