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The Application of a Radial Basis Function Morphing Technique to a Validated Full Human Body Finite Element Model

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abstract
Motor vehicle crashes kill over 1 million people worldwide each year making them one of the most common causes of death. With finite element models being used as tools to study blunt injuries, it is critical to validate them in a range of loading scenarios to ensure accurate model outputs. While human body models have typically been validated qualitatively, quantitative methods available to researchers can provide objective comparisons to the experimental data or between models. Validated human body models can help reveal the role that body habitus plays in injury outcomes for motor vehicle occupants. The objective of this dissertation was to validate a mid-sized male full human body finite element model and use that model as a basis for the development of a large male model.
subject
contributor
Vavalle, Nicholas Aaron (author)
Gayzik, F. Scott (committee chair)
Danelson, Kerry A (committee member)
Kemper, Andrew R (committee member)
Pajewski, Nicholas M (committee member)
Stitzel, Joel D (committee member)
date
2015-06-23T08:35:39Z (accessioned)
2015-12-22T09:30:10Z (available)
2015 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2015-12-22 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/57110 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
The Application of a Radial Basis Function Morphing Technique to a Validated Full Human Body Finite Element Model
type
Dissertation

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