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GENETIC AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF TYPE 2 DIABETES AND DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS

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abstract
Over 29 million Americans (9.3%) are affected by type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D is characterized by the body not producing enough insulin and not responding to the insulin that it does produce resulting in high blood glucose. Common complications associated with T2D include cardiovascular disease (CVD), nephropathy or end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), and cognitive decline. CVD is the most common complication with up to 65% of individuals with T2D dying due to CVD. Individuals with T2D are 2 – 4 times more likely to die due to CVD causes than those without T2D. Several explanations as to why individuals with T2D have an increased risk for CVD have been proposed. These include: high glucose independent of other risk factors, the atherogenic profile of diabetes (i.e. dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, etc.) often termed the “common soil” hypothesis, or that it is common genetic risk factors that contribute to both T2D and CVD. However, none of these adequately explain the increased risk. This thesis attempts to explain the genetic causes of T2D and complications including CVD in individuals with T2D. It also explores a possible biochemical link between T2D and CVD.
subject
Advanced Glycation End Products
Cardiovascular Disease
Genetics
Haptoglobin
Type 2 Diabetes
contributor
Adams, Jeremy Nathaniel (author)
Bowden, Donald W (committee chair)
Howard, Timothy D (committee member)
Allred, Nicholette D (committee member)
Ng, Maggie CY (committee member)
Parks, John S (committee member)
date
2015-06-23T08:35:50Z (accessioned)
2015-12-22T09:30:10Z (available)
2015 (issued)
degree
Molecular Genetics & Genomics (discipline)
embargo
2015-12-22 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/57138 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
GENETIC AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF TYPE 2 DIABETES AND DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS
type
Dissertation

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