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IN THE SOULS OF ALL OF US: MASCULINITY, WHITE SUPREMACY, AND THE DISCOURSE OF LYNCHING IN AMERICA

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abstract
This paper is an exploration of the ways in which the social categories of gender, race, and religion intersected in the development and perpetuation of the discourse of lynching, particularly as this discourse relates to the era of spectacle lynching (late 1880s to early 1930s). After offering an historical and ritual analysis of the practice of lynching, examining the ways this practice reified and perpetuated a normative social discourse concerned with white supremacy, anti-blackness, and patriarchal control, it then returns to the modern day, examining how this discourse is present and continues to be perpetuated within modern American culture.
subject
lynching
masculinity
racialized masculinity
racial violence
rituals of violence
white supremacy
contributor
O'Brien, Annie Rose (author)
Neal, Ronald B (committee chair)
Whitaker, Jarrod L (committee member)
Hicks, Derek S (committee member)
date
2015-06-23T08:35:56Z (accessioned)
2015 (issued)
degree
Religion (discipline)
10000-01-01 (liftdate)
embargo
forever (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/57163 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
IN THE SOULS OF ALL OF US: MASCULINITY, WHITE SUPREMACY, AND THE DISCOURSE OF LYNCHING IN AMERICA
type
Thesis

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