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CD133 Antibody Conjugation to Decellularized Human Heart Valves For Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell Capture

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title
CD133 Antibody Conjugation to Decellularized Human Heart Valves For Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell Capture
author
Vossler, John David
abstract
The long term efficacy of heart valve bioprostheses is limited by progressive degeneration characterized by immune mediated inflammation and calcification. To avoid this degeneration, decellularized heart valves with functionalized surfaces capable of rapid in vivo endothelialization have been developed. The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of CD133 antibody-conjugated valve tissue to capture circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Decellularized human pulmonary valve tissue was conjugated with CD133 antibody at varying concentrations and exposed to CD133 expressing NTERA-2 cl.D1 (NT2) cells in a microflow chamber. The amount of CD133 antibody conjugated on the valve tissue surface and the number of NT2 cells captured in the presence of shear stress was measured. Both the amount of CD133 antibody conjugated to the valve leaflet surface and the number of adherent NT2 cells increased as the concentration of CD133 antibody present in the surface immobilization procedure increased. The data presented in this study support the hypothesis that the rate of CD133+ cell adhesion in the presence of shear stress to decellularized heart valve tissue functionalized by CD133 antibody conjugation increases as the quantity of CD133 antibody conjugated to the tissue surface increases.
subject
CD133
Cell Capture
Decellularized Heart Valve
Endothelial Progenitor Cell
Heart Valve
Heart Valve Cryopreservation
contributor
Lee, Sang Jin (committee chair)
Jackson, John D (committee member)
Miller, Preston R (committee member)
Stewart, John H (committee member)
date
2015-08-25T08:35:39Z (accessioned)
2015-08-25T08:35:39Z (available)
2015 (issued)
degree
Molecular Medicine and Translational Science (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/57271 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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