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A study of the neuropharmacology and genetics of dopamine: using common, preclinical behavioral techniques, cognitive batteries, and genetic analyses to unravel the dopaminergic system

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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abstract
Dopamine is the most common neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain and is a key modulator of reward-related behaviors. Through the use of animal models, the dopaminergic system has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. Furthermore, the application of genetic technologies has helped uncover how modulation of dopaminergic signaling leads to modification of normal behavior and contributes to negative phenotypes and symptoms associated with diseases like attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cocaine dependence, and obesity. This dissertation explores a number of behaviors, learned and unconditioned, and the contribution of dopaminergic neurotransmission to each by using both human and non-human primates as subjects.
subject
Cognition
dopa decarboxylase
Dopamine
Dopamine D3 receptors
Type 2 diabetes
yawning
contributor
Martelle, Susan Elizabeth (author)
Bowden, Donald W (committee chair)
Allred, Nicholette D (committee member)
Howard, Timothy (committee member)
Jorgensen, Matthew J (committee member)
Weiner, Jeffrey (committee member)
date
2016-05-21T08:35:27Z (accessioned)
2016-11-20T09:30:12Z (available)
2016 (issued)
degree
Physiology and Pharmacology (discipline)
embargo
2016-11-20 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/59260 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
A study of the neuropharmacology and genetics of dopamine: using common, preclinical behavioral techniques, cognitive batteries, and genetic analyses to unravel the dopaminergic system
type
Dissertation

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