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DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TARGETING CARBOHYDRATE ANTIGENS IN CANCER

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title
DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TARGETING CARBOHYDRATE ANTIGENS IN CANCER
author
Littrell, Chad
abstract
Since the first description by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have quickly become a key component in the select targeting, blocking and clearance of many diseases by the immune system. Today mAbs constitute the fastest growing segment of immunotherapy in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. These unique and novel proteins are capable of binding to specific antigens in vivo and flagging cells displaying them for destruction. Over the last two decades, numerous studies have shown that a variety of cancers alter their glycosylation patterns resulting in the extracellular presentation of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Despite promising research into anti-TACA therapeutics over the years, only one anti-TACA monoclonal antibody is approved for cancer treatment. In an effort to advance immunotherapy, the objective of this research was to identify, develop, and characterize novel monoclonal antibodies targeting saccharide antigens. Here we show PD-1-/- mice on a C57BL/6 background can be used to generate an immunogenic response to desialylated bovine submaxillary mucin (dBSM). From these we produced anti-GlcNAc (N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine) and anti-GalNAc (N-Acetyl-D-Galactosamine) mAbs capable of binding to TA3-Ha murine adenocarcinoma. These novel mAbs open a gateway to understanding alternative targeting of cancer cells and expand opportunities in immunotherapy and theranostics.
subject
Cancer
contributor
Haas, Karen M (committee chair)
Singh, Ravi (committee member)
Lo, Hui-Wen (committee member)
date
2016-05-21T08:35:42Z (accessioned)
2021-05-04T08:30:12Z (available)
2016 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Science – MS (discipline)
embargo
2021-05-04 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/59292 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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