Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

DTI, structural network connectivity, and neurocognitive changes associated with subconcussive impacts in youth football players

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
American football has the highest rates of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) among youth athletes (age 8-13 years) in the United States. It is well established that concussions can lead to disruption of white matter (WM) microstructural integrity and lead to neurocognitive impairment. Little is known, however, about the effects of cumulative repetitive head impacts, or so-called subconcussive head impact exposure. Neuroimaging analyses of youth athletes may allow characterization of potential dose-response changes in white matter due to sports-related cumulative subconcussive head impact exposure, particularly during this time of extraordinary brain development.
subject
contributor
Bahrami, Naeim (author)
Whitlow, Christopher T (committee chair)
Maldjian, Joseph (committee member)
Munley, Michael (committee member)
Jung, Youngkyoo (committee member)
Stitzel, Joel (committee member)
date
2016-08-25T08:35:18Z (accessioned)
2021-08-19T08:30:13Z (available)
2016 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2021-08-19 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/62630 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
DTI, structural network connectivity, and neurocognitive changes associated with subconcussive impacts in youth football players
type
Dissertation

Usage Statistics