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AERIAL WARFARE BETWEEN BATS AND MOTHS: EFFICACY OF ACOUSTIC APOSEMATISM, FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF UNPALATABLE PREY, AND TWO NOVEL ANTI-BAT STRATEGIES

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title
AERIAL WARFARE BETWEEN BATS AND MOTHS: EFFICACY OF ACOUSTIC APOSEMATISM, FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF UNPALATABLE PREY, AND TWO NOVEL ANTI-BAT STRATEGIES
author
Dowdy, Nicolas Joel
abstract
Tiger moths (Erebidae: Arctiinae) have experienced intense selective pressure from echolocating, insectivorous bats for nearly 65 million years. In response, they have evolved a suite of remarkable defenses to deal with their would-be predators. Three key innovations underlie the success of the tiger moth lineage: (1) ultrasound-sensitive ears used to hear the foraging cries of attacking bats, (2) the ability to produce ultrasound of their own, and (3) the sequestration of toxic compounds from their host plants.
subject
Anti-Predator Defense
Aposematism
Arctiinae
Bat
Moth
Predator-Prey
contributor
Conner, William E (committee chair)
Zaspel, Jennifer M (committee member)
Anderson, Todd M (committee member)
Fahrbach, Susan E (committee member)
Kron, Kathy A (committee member)
date
2017-06-15T08:36:06Z (accessioned)
2018-06-14T08:30:12Z (available)
2017 (issued)
degree
Biology (discipline)
embargo
2018-06-14 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/82225 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Dissertation

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