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“VERBAL HYGIENE” ON THE RADIO: AN EXPLORATION INTO PERCEPTIONS OF FEMALE VOICES ON PUBLIC RADIO AND HOW THEY REFLECT LANGUAGE AND GENDER IDEOLOGIES WITHIN AMERICAN CULTURE

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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abstract
This thesis examines how voice works as an identity marker that reinforces language and gender ideologies, or “common-sense” beliefs about language, within American culture. In particular, it investigates the perception of female voices on public radio. As women’s voices enter the public sphere through an authoritative medium, such as National Public Radio, they challenge traditionally held notions of “good” language use. This project considers expectations of how men and women “should” speak, and how this, coupled with a perceived notion of a “standardized” English language, influences the way public radio listeners construct identity through the disembodied voices of radio. This thesis uses this cultural backdrop to examine how these ideologies lead to overt criticisms of female voices on the radio through acts of “verbal hygiene,” or metacommentaries on language and prescriptions for “good” language use, due to tensions between concepts of authenticity and institutional, or “social," voices, as reflected in both industry and listener constructions of how language “should” be used on public radio in regards to voice and tonality.
subject
contributor
Barrett, Jennifer M (author)
Lancaster, Zak (committee chair)
Holdridge, Jefferson (committee member)
Von Burg, Ronald (committee member)
date
2017-08-22T08:35:23Z (accessioned)
2017-08-22T08:35:23Z (available)
2017 (issued)
degree
English (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/86340 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
“VERBAL HYGIENE” ON THE RADIO: AN EXPLORATION INTO PERCEPTIONS OF FEMALE VOICES ON PUBLIC RADIO AND HOW THEY REFLECT LANGUAGE AND GENDER IDEOLOGIES WITHIN AMERICAN CULTURE
type
Thesis

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