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No Laughing Matter? Examining the Effect of Stigma and Humor on Coping Efficacy and Empowerment when Seeking Support for Mental Health Conditions

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abstract
The goal of this study is to explore how humor and stigma affect comforting quality and reappraisals when seeking support for a mental health condition (MHC). Participants (N = 159) were asked to describe a time they sought support for their MHC. They then completed a survey to assess their self-stigma, use of humor when seeking support, and support outcomes. Stigma positively predicted the use of negative humor when seeking support for a MHC. Stigma also negatively predicted coping efficacy; however, this relationship became positive when mediated by a participant’s use of negative humor. Positive humor positively predicted coping self-efficacy and empowerment, which in turn predicted comforting quality. The results address a gap in the literature that does not examine the use of humor when seeking support. The findings also extend knowledge on how humor and stigma affect reappraisals of MHCs.
subject
Coping
Empowerment
Humor
Reappraisal
Stigma
Support
contributor
Peters, Lauren (author)
Priem, Jennifer S. (committee chair)
Gladding, Samuel T. (committee member)
date
2018-05-24T08:35:46Z (accessioned)
2018-05-24T08:35:46Z (available)
2018 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/90686 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
No Laughing Matter? Examining the Effect of Stigma and Humor on Coping Efficacy and Empowerment when Seeking Support for Mental Health Conditions
type
Thesis

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