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EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL ABSTINENCE ON CRAVING, STRESS, AND NEUROBIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONING IN MODERATE TO HEAVY ALCOHOL CONSUMERS

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abstract
The importance of prevention in alcoholism is underscored by relapse rates as high as 70%. Although further development of addiction treatment remains a high priority, equally important is advancement in prevention. In this regard, attention is warranted on the neural and behavioral markers of vulnerability to transitioning from controlled drinking to AUD. Indeed, the majority of research to date has focused on alcohol dependen¬cy. Much less work has focused on a lifestyle including regular alcohol use without a history of AUD. The goal of this dissertation was to provide a step forward in the field of prevention research by studying individuals who exhibit moderate to heavy alcohol consumption (averaging 2.3 servings, 6 days per week). The specific aims were to evaluate the impact of imposed alcohol abstinence and normal drinking routines on stress and craving and to examine whether craving and brain connectivity are moderated by patterns of cardiac vagal tone.
subject
alcohol
autonomic nervous system
craving
ecological momentary assessment
fMRI
stress
contributor
Mayhugh, Rhiannon Elaine (author)
Laurienti, Paul J (committee chair)
Simpson, Sean L (committee member)
Burdette, Jonathan H (committee member)
McCool, Brian (committee member)
Rejeski, W. Jack (committee member)
date
2018-05-24T08:36:21Z (accessioned)
2019-05-23T08:30:11Z (available)
2018 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience (discipline)
embargo
2019-05-23 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/90768 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL ABSTINENCE ON CRAVING, STRESS, AND NEUROBIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONING IN MODERATE TO HEAVY ALCOHOL CONSUMERS
type
Dissertation

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