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Solid Organ Donation and Islamic Bioethics in America: As Guided by International Sources and Contemporary Approaches to Forming Opinions

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title
Solid Organ Donation and Islamic Bioethics in America: As Guided by International Sources and Contemporary Approaches to Forming Opinions
author
Emery, Mandy
abstract
Solid organ donation and transplantation is permitted in Islam as a life-saving procedure. In the United States, despite national acceptance, resources, and centers dedicated to procuring and providing organs information and data does not include figures on religious beliefs. Further, it does not represent the percentage of need among Muslims as recipients or donors. The purpose of this thesis is to present sources that can provide guidance for Muslim Americans when considering solid organ donation and transplantation. Three central questions direct this research to address a modern approach to obtaining guidance via the internet in the form of fatwā. And, its capacity to provide information to the ‘umma and ‘ulama, and highlight this modern tool to empower individuals in a way that meets personal and bioethical standards to enable decision-making. Specifically, the fatwa formula , eFatwa, and sites dedicated to connecting Muslims leaders with the ‘umma show a firsthand, contemporary approach to overcome geopolitical restrictions and disconnection from areas of national and cultural origin. Thesis research findings point out that preservation of religious and personal autonomy are aspects to consider for all Muslims when seeking guidance. Still, while the presence of cultural influences on individual perceptions and beliefs arise Islamic views of preserving of life as a commendable, charitable action it does not guarantee that an individual will participate or elect for solid organ donation on a personal versus communal level. Further research would assist in highlighting these factors while aiding in expansion of knowledge of donation/transplantation procedures.
subject
Decision-making
Diaspora
Fatwa
Internet
Sociocultural
Transplantation
contributor
Van Doorn-Harder, Pieternella (committee chair)
Iltis, Ana S (committee member)
Hyde, Michael J (committee member)
date
2018-08-23T08:35:34Z (accessioned)
2025-08-26 (available)
2018 (issued)
degree
Bioethics (discipline)
embargo
2025-08-26 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/92374 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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