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Image-Based Morphological Modeling of Soft and Bony Tissue with Applications in Prognostics and Medical Device Design

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abstract
Improvements in non-invasive imaging and three-dimensional visualization techniques permit highly detailed morphological analyses of internal organs. Morphometric quantification of bony and soft tissue anatomy from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance 1 images is used to quantify shape and density variation of structures and to associate these variations with existing abnormalities and dysfunctions for disease prognosis and prediction of injury risk. Analyzing soft tissue structures is particularly challenging due to the lack of homologous landmarks that can be reliably identified across specimens. Current tools to assess morphology of the internal organs generally do not consider accurate 3D shape analysis based on statistical methods. This study uses high resolution image modalities to create 3D models of soft and bony tissue based on homologous landmarks in order to quantify biological variability. High temporal and spatial resolution images will provide detailed anatomical models of internal organs. This dissertation is comprised of three parts:
subject
bone mineral density
colorectal cancer
heart failure
medical device desgin
morphological modeling
contributor
Saffarzadeh, Mona (author)
Saffarzade, Mona (committee chair)
Weaver, Ashley Ann (committee member)
Gayzik, Francis Scott (committee member)
Stitzel, Joel Douglas (committee member)
Weis, Jared Anthony (committee member)
lenchik, Leon (committee member)
date
2019-01-11T09:35:14Z (accessioned)
2018 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
2023-12-30 (liftdate)
embargo
2023-12-30 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/93043 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Image-Based Morphological Modeling of Soft and Bony Tissue with Applications in Prognostics and Medical Device Design
type
Dissertation

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